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7 women try Universal Standard’s new size-inclusive line of jeans that goes from 00 to 40 — here’s the verdict

Insider Picks writes about products and services to help you navigate when shopping online. Insider Inc. receives a commission from our affiliate partners when you buy through our links, but our reporting and recommendations are always independent and objective.

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  • Universal Standard is a size-inclusive clothing brand that’s making high-quality, stylish basics for women of all shapes and sizes. 
  • The brand’s latest collection, Denim by (US) boasts a wide range of comfortable, cute jeans in sizes 00-40. 
  • A group of women at Business Insider had the opportunity to try the jeans for ourselves. Our size pool only ran up to a 16 because that’s who responded to our open call for volunteer testers at Insider Inc., but we’re confident our positive experience will apply for sizes across the board.
  • You can find what we thought about the new line below, or get straight to shopping the collection here

For many women, shopping with friends is just a fun way to spend an afternoon. For Alexandra Waldman and Polina Veksler, it was one of these department store excursions that turned the friends into cofounders of a fashion brand that’s championing inclusivity like you’ve never seen it before. 

When shopping, Waldman couldn’t fashionable, high-quality clothing in her size. "I wanted to wear what was available to smaller women, and there was nothing like that on the market," she tells Business Insider. With recent data showing the average American woman is between size 16 to 18, the lack of stylish options in larger sizes signifies a huge hole in the market. Someone had to start filling the gap, so Waldman and Veksler got right to it. 

Universal Standard is leveling the playing field by offering high-quality wardrobe staples for all women, with sizes ranging from 00-40. Over the past four years, the brand has been providing shoppers with the modern, high-quality, beautiful basics they deserve. Just a few months ago, they released a new collection, what Waldman says is the "holy grail item" of most wardrobes.

If you’re thinking denim, you’re right. 

There’s nothing like slipping on a pair of jeans that fits perfectly. "It’s classic and the wardrobe equivalent of a comfort zone," Waldman says. Denim by (US) is the brand’s attempt at making great jeans that all women can feel good wearing — and after trying them ourselves, we think they did a pretty great job. 

Screen Shot 2019 05 23 at 11.52.57 AM

This collection is the largest size run of denim in the world, servicing women sizes 00-40, in regular, tall, and petite lengths. And, each size was created with all women — not just fit models in mind. Universal Standard even realeased a new "See it in My Size" feature, that lets you see the pants worn on real women in any size across the entire collection. All of the jeans are made with a comfy high-stretch fabric, come in a range of washes and styles, and cost $90. 

We were lucky enough to get to try the jeans. A group of eight women, spanning a range of sizes (though admittedly limited in nature since participants only included volunteers from around Insider Inc.), tried out different styles and washes to put this size-inclusive denim to the test. Though we recognize our review doesn’t encompass the entire size spectrum of the line, we’re confident that our positive experience with sizes up to a 16 will translate for everyone.

You can find our in-depth reviews below, but if you just want the spoiler, we were generally impressed with how comfortable, stylish, and flattering the jeans were across the board. 

Shop the $90 Denim by (US) collection here or keep reading for our reviews below.

Hollis Johnson / Business Insider

Connie Chen, Insider Picks reporter: Seine High Rise Skinny Jeans in Distressed Blue

Universal Standard’s denim is the rare breed that I can say with 100% confidence I’ll be comfortable in all day long. Though it’s soft and stretchy with a forgiving waistband, it doesn’t look the part, meaning that I can look stylish without ever compromising fit and comfort.

Sally Kaplan, Insider Picks editor: Seine High Rise Skinny Jeans in Distressed Blue

These jeans are so comfortable that I wore them on an airplane the day we took these photos. An airplane!!! Normally I’d never venture past anything more restrictive than leggings for a three-hour flight, but behold: These jeans were just as comfy as my yoga pants.

They have a serious amount of stretch, and are the only pair I have that I’m not dying to take off by the end of the day. They also come in petites, which is a godsend for someone who’s 5-foot-1.5-inches (can’t forget that half inch!). I usually wear a size 8 or 10, and I opted for a 10 in these, which probably wasn’t the right call. There’s so much stretch that you can comfortably size down if you’re between sizes.

Hollis Johnson / Business Insider

Mara Leighton, Insider Picks reporter: Sava High Rise Flare Jeans in Black

I’m typically a committed high-rise skinny jean wearer, but I opted for the more adventurous Sava High Rise in black this time around. Universal Standard, with its comfy, flattering denim, was a good choice to go out of the box with — especially with its helpful "see it in your size" tool.

In person, the jeans are pretty beautiful, and they’re comfortable enough for all-day wear, traveling, and the odd lunge. The flare isn’t so drastic that it looks costume-y, and the silhouette is fitted though the hip, waist, and thigh in a way that kept me from being swallowed by the style. All in all, couldn’t be happier!

My one note is that the 78% cotton fabric may pick up more fuzz than a really stiff denim. This is also what makes them so comfortable so, if you’re okay with the little inconvenience, just plan to have a lint roller on hand for the black pair.

Remi Rosmarin, Insider Picks reporter: Sava High Rise Flare Jeans in Dark Indigo

I typically stick to stiff denim, usually in skinny or straight-leg styles. But, I’ve been seeing the retro flare jeans everywhere, and with no need for any more skinny jeans, I decided to give the Sava High Rise a try. 

These are probably the most comfortable jeans I’ve ever slipped on, especially considering that they’re high rise. They’re surprising sturdy and stretchy, so they have the look of a really nice pair of jeans but the stretch of a yoga pant. That may sound extreme, but we were all able to bend, twist, and squat in these, comfortably. I found the legs to run a little long, but a pair of booties quickly remedied that issue. I love this versatile style — it’s fun for a Friday night, but professional enough for a Tuesday meeting. 

Hollis Johnson / Business Insider

Megan Foster, Insider Picks intern: Logan High Rise 5 Pocket Vintage in Distressed Grey

I tried out the Logan High-Rise 5-Pocket Vintage jeans, which looked drastically different than any other pair I owned. I have a more traditional style and have veered away from the "distressed" look, but I was surprised to see that this grey pair was still professional enough to wear to work. They were stretchy but looked like your typical pair of jeans — unlike some leggings that resemble cotton more than denim.

So far, I’ve recommended this company to my mom, my best friend, my roommate, and the girl on the subway that was talking about jeans with her friend (I wasn’t eavesdropping, I swear). What I’m trying to say is that I finally found a pair of jeans other than my tried-and-true middle school brand that fit perfectly and made me feel confident.

Julia Naftulin, INSIDER reporter: Siene High Rise Skinny Jeans in Distressed Blue

As a size 12, jean shopping can be a major nightmare. Usually, the jeans will fit my thighs but be too baggy in the waist, or even if they would fit the waist, I can’t pull them up past my hips. That’s why denim with some stretch to it is an instant go-to for me. Universal Standard’s jeans offered a super stretchy and comfortable fit probably the most comfortable I’ve ever felt. It felt like I was wearing leggings all day. Although I wish they were a bit less stretchy in the belt/crotch/zipper area (the fit felt a bit loose there), they were otherwise a great fit and probably the only pair of jeans I’d consider wearing on an airplane.

The front pockets were huge which I was not expecting, but could be a major plus for someone who loves keeping things in pockets. I thought they could’ve been a bit smaller but that’s just personal preference.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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A dazzling new photo series gives a rare glimpse inside Huawei’s surreal Shenzen campus

Huawei Ox HornKevin Frayer/Getty

  • Chinese tech giant Huawei has become the focus of a geopolitical flashpoint in US-China relations.
  • At a delicate time for the company, Getty photographer Kevin Frayer was given privileged access to its headquarters outside the Chinese city of Shenzen.
  • He observed a sprawling campus, which spans 3.5 square miles and features buildings inspired by European landmarks.
  • Home to 25,000 workers, Frayer found employees sleeping in their lunch breaks, taking art classes, and playing ping pong.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Huawei is the second-biggest smartphone maker in the world, and is currently at the heart of a geopolitical fight between the US and China.

America last week threw oil on the fire by blacklisting Huawei, meaning tech companies including Google dramatically severed ties their Chinese counterpart.

Read more: Here are all the companies that have cut ties with Huawei, dealing the Chinese tech giant a crushing blow

As the firestorm around the company has grown, Huawei has opened itself up more to journalists, inviting a number inside its sprawling headquarters. Even the usually reclusive CEO Ren Zhengfei has courted the press in several interviews in recent months.

To this end, a new photo series from Getty photographer Kevin Frayer offers a glimpse inside the embattled firm’s surreal new campus outside of Shenzen, with buildings mimicking European landmarks, pull-out beds so employees can nap in their lunch-breaks, and black swans.

Scroll on for a look inside Huawei.

Huawei’s "Ox Horn" campus is located just outside the city of Shenzen, and houses 25,000 employees.

Kevin Frayer/Getty

The campus spans 3.5 square miles, and the architecture is inspired by European cities.

Kevin Frayer/Getty

Streets and boulevards connect the buildings.

Kevin Frayer/Getty

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Kristaps Porzingis threatened to leave the Knicks and go back to Europe days before his shocking trade to the Mavericks

Kristaps PorzingisAP Photo/LM Otero

  • Knicks president Steve Mills said that Kristaps Porzingis gave the team a seven-day deadline to trade him away, threatening to return to Europe if they didn’t comply.
  • "He walked into my office … and said, point-blank said to us, ‘I don’t want to be here. I’m not going to re-sign with the Knicks. And I’m going to give you seven days to trade me or I’m going back to Europe,’" Mills said.
  • The news clarifies how the blockbuster deal that sent Porzingis to the Dallas Mavericks in January came together seemingly in minutes.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories

One of the most shocking moves of the NBA season came back in January when Kristaps Porzingis was traded from the New York Knicks to the Dallas Mavericks.

The deal seemed to manifest out of nothing in a matter of minutes, turning from rumor to reality at a pace not usually seen in a league where roster moves are speculated about months, if not years, in advance.

As it turns out, the Knicks seem to have had good reason to push the trade through so quickly, as Porzingis had apparently given the team a seven-day deadline to move him to another team, or else he would return to Europe.

Read more: We’re learning more about the Kristaps Porzingis trade, and it’s becoming clear that it’s one of the most complicated deals in recent history

Speaking at an event on Wednesday, Knicks president Steve Mills said Porzingis had made it clear to the team that he would not re-sign with New York.

"He walked into my office … and said, point-blank said to us, ‘I don’t want to be here. I’m not going to re-sign with the Knicks. And I’m going to give you seven days to trade me or I’m going back to Europe,’" Mills said.

"So fortunately for us, that process that we talked about starting in September, we had a number of deals lined up. We started the trade calls as soon as he walked out of the office."

You can watch Mills’ comments below.

The story clarifies the timeline surrounding the trade a bit more. While Porzingis would only become a restricted free agent during the 2019 offseason, his declaration that he would not re-sign with the Knicks gave the team extra motivation to get a deal done before the deadline to get the most potential return for the star.

Further, Porzingis’ seven-day ultimatum put the trade on the fast track. While the Latvian big man was only planning to go to Europe to rehab rather than play, his absence from the team would likely make it harder for the Knicks to find a trade partner, or at the very least would tank his value to frustrating levels for the New York front office as they attempted to make a deal.

Porzingis has not played since February 2018, when he went down with an ACL tear in a game against the Bucks.

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The high-school sprinter putting up Olympic-level times has accepted an NFL wide receiver’s open challenge to a $10,000 race

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Trump is set to roll out a $16 billion bailout package as the trade war stings American farmers

Trump farmReuters/Jonathan Ernst

  • The Trump administration was set to announce a second round of aid for farmers who have been stung by its yearlong trade war with China.
  • The new package was expected to resemble the Market Facilitation Program, which last year provided direct and indirect payments to farmers.
  • The trade war has blocked American farmers from one of their biggest customers, sending prices and exports of commodities sharply lower.
  • Visit Markets Insider for more stories.

The Trump administration on Thursday was set to roll out a second round of aid for farmers who have been stung by its yearlong trade war with China, bringing the price tag of bailout efforts so far to about $28 billion.

"Some of this $16 billion is going to be used for market access programs to go and build markets elsewhere," Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said Thursday in an interview with Fox Business Network ahead of an anticipated formal announcement from the Trump administration. 

The new package was expected to resemble a $12 billion aid package announced last year, which provided direct and indirect payments to farmers after China placed retaliatory tariffs on agricultural products from the US. That move has blocked American farmers from one of their biggest customers, sending prices and exports of commodities sharply lower.

The Trump administration has been eager to assuage constituents across rural America ahead of the 2020 elections. Research suggests Republican counties have borne the brunt of the tariffs on $250 billion worth of tariffs from China and retaliatory measures targeting $110 billion in American products.

Trump has found support in his calls to crack down on certain policies from Beijing, such as state-funded subsidies that officials said have the potential to distort world markets.

But as tariffs cast a cloud of uncertainty on a second growing season, some farmers have grown frustrated at the dispute and negotiations that began last March. American agricultural exports are expected to fall by roughly $1.9 billion this year, largely because of retaliatory duties in China.

"Every time we turn around we feel like we’re getting closer to a deal and then nothing happens," said Rob Shaffer, a soybean and corn grower in El Paso, Illinois. "So, I guess I’ve become immune."

NOW WATCH: I’ve used iPhones for nearly a decade and switched to the Samsung Galaxy S10. Now I understand Android loyalty in a way I never understood before.

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SEE ALSO: Trump promised tariff relief to America’s farmers, but the shutdown left tens of thousands in the cold

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The 25 most expensive cities in the world for gas

traffic englandGetty Images

Unless you want to empty your bank account, opt for a bus next time you’re in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong charges the highest prices for gas worldwide, according to Deutsche Bank’s annual "Mapping the World’s Prices" report. The city’s gas prices cost more than double the New York price, and rose 7% in the last year.

Read more: Here’s how much an iPhone XS costs in 25 different countries

Other expensive cities for gas include Oslo, Helsinki and Milan. Cities in the Middle East (like Cairo, Riyadh, and Dubai) sold gas at cheaper rates than the US. 

Egypt had some of the lowest gas prices at just 39 cents for 1 liter (or a fourth-gallon) of gas.

Here are the most expensive places to get gas around the world:

25. Cost of 1 liter of gas in Warsaw, Poland: $1.32

Getty Images

Relative to New York gas prices: 165%

Year-over-year change: -2%

24. Cost of 1 liter of gas in Vienna, Austria: $1.34

VitalyEdush/iStock

Relative to New York gas prices: 167%

Year-over-year change: -9%

23. Cost of 1 liter of gas in Prague, Czech Republic: $1.43

Shutterstock

Relative to New York gas prices: 178%

Year-over-year change: -4%

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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SEE ALSO: Here’s how much an iPhone XS costs in 25 different countries

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33 high school students took photos to capture the everyday reality of living in North Philadelphia, where the poverty rate is 40% and life expectancy is 20 years shorter

PhotoVoice Exhibition OpeningThomas Jefferson University Photography Services

  • 33 high school students took hundreds of photos as part of a project to assess the health needs of Latinos in a section of North Philadelphia.
  • The photos show trash, abandoned buildings, and discarded needles. Some images are hopeful, too.
  • "I looked for things that affect us in a way that people don’t really think about," one student said.
  • You can see more of the students’ photos in the slideshow below.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Yariel, who’s 18, walks by the empty, trash-strewn lot every day on his way to work.

So when he had the chance to participate in a project taking pictures that show the biggest barriers to healthy living in North Philadelphia, he knew what he’d photograph.

"It was just a mess, and it looked like a dump," he said in an interview from his job at Providence Center, a community organization where he works on projects like tree-planting and neighborhood cleanups. "It overall looks bad for your community."

6th and Huntingdon

Business Insider isn’t using the last name of Yariel or the other students we interviewed to protect their privacy.

Yariel’s photos were part of an effort by the Philadelphia Collaborative for Health Equity to assess the health needs of Latinos in a section of North Philadelphia, a particularly disadvantaged part of America’s sixth-biggest city. In all, 33 students took hundreds of photos for the project. They displayed their best work in an exhibition in late April.

‘They’re the experts on their own lives’

The idea of including teens in the health-needs assessment, alongside standard quantitative analyses and interviews with community groups, was to gain a more complete understanding of issues facing the community, said Caleb Dafilou, a research fellow at the Philadelphia Collaborative for Health Equity who worked with the students. Dafilou also authored the final report.

"These kids are living the experience. They’re the experts on their own lives," he said. "It was really important for us to come in here and learn from them."

The Philadelphia Collaborative for Health Equity is part of the Jefferson Health hospital system, and was sparked by a $1 million donation in 2017. After conducting the health assessment, the collaborative put out a call for proposals to address the key problems it identified: mental health; trauma, safety, and violence; housing; and the built environment. The plan is to spend $600,000 to fund a dozen projects for a year.

"We wanted to use the principle of doing it from the ground up, to go and listen and build trust in the community," said Dr. Jack Ludmir, executive director of the collaborative. "If you look at health outcome metrics for the city, these communities have some of the worst health metrics."

In the area of North Philadelphia targeted by the study, about 40 percent of people have incomes below the poverty line, Aneri Pattani of The Philadelphia Inquirer reported in an article on the initiative. Overall, children born in parts of North Philadelphia can expect to live 20 years less than those who grow up in wealthier parts of the city, according to her article.

Jeran, who’s 18, said he wanted to highlight problems like the lack of healthy food in his community and the prevalence of abandoned buildings.

Jeran A./Philadelphia Collaborative for Health Equity

"I looked for things that affect us in a way that people don’t really think about," he said in an interview.

Another theme that came up a lot in the photos was drug use, Dafilou said. This picture shows used needles in a storm drain.

Ashanti and Anthony/Philadelphia Collaborative for Health Equity

Here’s the caption written by the student who took the picture:

"It’s bad for the community because there are always kids running around. My quote means that there be kids playing around and they can fall and get cut from the needle and get sick. Also there’s more in the sewers and that’s a health issue because the water gets polluted by whatever in the needle."

Felipe wanted to make sure I knew that there was much more to his city than the images of trash, needles and homelessness.

Felipe C./Philadelphia Collaborative for Health Equity

"Some community members in Philadelphia actually do get together," he told me. "They do try to control the drugs and stuff, to make a better environment for the children."

This photo that he took is titled "The sky is not the limit."

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Obama is reportedly feeling competitive after Michelle’s smash-hit memoir and sometimes says she used a ghostwriter

barack and michelleMark Wilson/Getty Images

  • President Barack Obama is writing a memoir he has yet to finish, and may be feeling competitive because of the success of his wife Michelle’s smash hit "Becoming," which is on track to become the best-selling memoir of all time.
  • Obama sometimes likes to point out that he’s writing his memoir himself, while his wife’s was written by a ghostwriter, anonymous sources told The Atlantic on Thursday
  • In celebrity and political memoirs, it’s common practice to bring on a ghostwriter, or an un-credited author who interprets their subject’s stories and then does the actual writing.

President Barack Obama is writing a memoir, but may be feeling competitive because of the success of his wife Michelle’s smash hit "Becoming," which is on track to become the best-selling memoir of all time.

As such, Obama sometimes likes to point out that he’s writing his memoir himself, while his wife’s was written by a ghostwriter, sources told The Atlantic on Thursday

The former president "is feeling competitive with his wife," Edward Isaac-Dovere wrote. 

"Sources note he’ll occasionally point out in conversation that he’s writing this book himself, while Michelle used a ghostwriter," he continues.

"Becoming," the biggest release of 2018, notes in the acknowledgments that a "team" of people helped her write the book. In celebrity and political memoirs, it’s common practice to bring on a ghostwriter, or an uncredited author who interprets their subject’s stories and then does the actual writing. 

President Donald Trump’s best seller, "The Art of The Deal," was similarly written by a ghostwriter.

But Obama has a good chance of dethroning his wife, as he remains popular and books on politics have routinely topped best seller charts over the last few years. 

Read the full inside story of Obama’s upcoming memoir here.

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American Airlines CEO reveals the most important lesson he learned from the legendary founder of Southwest Airlines (AAL)

Doug Parker American Airlines CEODonna McWilliam/Getty Images

  • American Airlines CEO Doug Parker says the art of listening is an integral skillset for business leaders.
  • It’s a lesson Parker learned by watching the late Herb Kelleher, founder and former CEO of Southwest Airlines.
  • According to Parker, listening is a skill that some business leaders may find to be counter to their natural inclinations because they feel the need to be the person who is talking and giving direction.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

American Airlines is the largest airline in the world with more than 130,000 employees and a fleet of 1,500 aircraft. At the helm of this corporate giant is Doug Parker. 

Parker first became an airline CEO in September 2001 at the age of 39 when he took over the top job at financially troubled America West. Twelve years and two mega-mergers later, he ascended his current position atop the Fort Worth, Texas-based airline.

Read more: American Airlines CEO reveals why a small Italian airline is the focus of the nastiest feud in the airline industry.

Nearly two decades into his tenure as CEO, Parker says the most important lesson in management he ever received came by watching Herb Kelleher, the legendary founder and former CEO of Southwest Airlines. 

"As a younger CEO at industry meetings, I would just do everything I could to just hang around Herb, just to observe and hope I could get some of it through osmosis," Parker said of Kelleher who passed away in January at the age of 87.  "What I learned in watching Herb was and what I picked up upon fairly early on is what an amazing listener he was."

According to Parker, Kelleher’s excellence as a listener was usually overshadowed by his charisma and gregarious personality.

Herb Kelleher 2005REUTERS/Jim Young"But really if you watch him, every conversation he was in was, he was really engaged, really listening," the American Airlines CEO said. "And what I realized is that was incredibly important to how he led because he learned and he took it back to his work and it made that company better and stronger."

"He was in tune with what was happening at all levels of his company. And he really cared about it," Parker added. 

For Parker, listening is an integral skill to success even though it’s not something you’d necessarily pick up in a business school class. It’s something he’s worked on over the years, but the American Airlines boss recognizes he’s still not quite at the Kelleher’s level. 

"That skill is one that I’ve had to work really hard on," he said. "I’m not even close to as good as Herb was at it, but I recognize the value of it."

American AirlinesWilliam Perugini/shutterstockAccording to Parker, it’s also a skill set that some business leaders may find to be counter to their natural inclinations because they feel the need to be the person who is talking and giving direction.

"What you need to do is listen intently to your team and the issues they’re dealing with and then use that to go support them and help them and make sure they have the tools they need," Parker said. "Because there are teams out there, all they want to do is do exactly what we all want, which is take care of our customers, make the company stronger."

"You don’t need to tell them that, you need to listen to them about what we’re doing that’s stopping them from doing that and help them do that," he added.

NOW WATCH: The history behind ‘slabs,’ the custom cars with an important place in Houston’s hip-hop community

See Also:

SEE ALSO: American Airlines CEO reveals when he would feel safe flying on the Boeing 737 Max again

FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content!

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American Airlines CEO reveals the most important lesson he learned from the legendary founder of Southwest Airlines (AAL)

Doug Parker American Airlines CEODonna McWilliam/Getty Images

  • American Airlines CEO Doug Parker says the art of listening is an integral skillset for business leaders.
  • It’s a lesson Parker learned by watching the late Herb Kelleher, founder and former CEO of Southwest Airlines.
  • According to Parker, listening is a skill that some business leaders may find to be counter to their natural inclinations because they feel the need to be the person who is talking and giving direction.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

American Airlines is the largest airline in the world with more than 130,000 employees and a fleet of 1,500 aircraft. At the helm of this corporate giant is Doug Parker. 

Parker first became an airline CEO in September 2001 at the age of 39 when he took over the top job at financially troubled America West. Twelve years and two mega-mergers later, he ascended his current position atop the Fort Worth, Texas-based airline.

Read more: American Airlines CEO reveals why a small Italian airline is the focus of the nastiest feud in the airline industry.

Nearly two decades into his tenure as CEO, Parker says the most important lesson in management he ever received came by watching Herb Kelleher, the legendary founder and former CEO of Southwest Airlines. 

"As a younger CEO at industry meetings, I would just do everything I could to just hang around Herb, just to observe and hope I could get some of it through osmosis," Parker said of Kelleher who passed away in January at the age of 87.  "What I learned in watching Herb was and what I picked up upon fairly early on is what an amazing listener he was."

According to Parker, Kelleher’s excellence as a listener was usually overshadowed by his charisma and gregarious personality.

Herb Kelleher 2005REUTERS/Jim Young"But really if you watch him, every conversation he was in was, he was really engaged, really listening," the American Airlines CEO said. "And what I realized is that was incredibly important to how he led because he learned and he took it back to his work and it made that company better and stronger."

"He was in tune with what was happening at all levels of his company. And he really cared about it," Parker added. 

For Parker, listening is an integral skill to success even though it’s not something you’d necessarily pick up in a business school class. It’s something he’s worked on over the years, but the American Airlines boss recognizes he’s still not quite at the Kelleher’s level. 

"That skill is one that I’ve had to work really hard on," he said. "I’m not even close to as good as Herb was at it, but I recognize the value of it."

American AirlinesWilliam Perugini/shutterstockAccording to Parker, it’s also a skill set that some business leaders may find to be counter to their natural inclinations because they feel the need to be the person who is talking and giving direction.

"What you need to do is listen intently to your team and the issues they’re dealing with and then use that to go support them and help them and make sure they have the tools they need," Parker said. "Because there are teams out there, all they want to do is do exactly what we all want, which is take care of our customers, make the company stronger."

"You don’t need to tell them that, you need to listen to them about what we’re doing that’s stopping them from doing that and help them do that," he added.

NOW WATCH: The history behind ‘slabs,’ the custom cars with an important place in Houston’s hip-hop community

See Also:

SEE ALSO: American Airlines CEO reveals when he would feel safe flying on the Boeing 737 Max again

FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content!

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Amazon’s updated Fire 7 tablets are available to preorder and ship on June 6 — here are all their specs and features

Insider Picks writes about products and services to help you navigate when shopping online. Insider Inc. receives a commission from our affiliate partners when you buy through our links, but our reporting and recommendations are always independent and objective.

Amazon Fire 7 TabletAmazon

  • Amazon is known for making versatile and smart tablets at an affordable price.
  • The company has unveiled a new version of the Amazon Fire 7 tablet that comes in a range of colors for a very reasonable price.
  • The Fire 7 is also available in a Kids Edition, which comes with a ton of kid-friendly books, videos, audiobooks, and more, thanks to FreeTime Unlimited.
  • You can preorder the new Fire 7 ($49.99) and Kids Edition ($99.99) on Amazon now and they’ll ship on June 6.

Amazon has a history of building good tablets at reasonable prices, and the company has finally taken the wraps off of its latest devices — the all-new Fire 7 tablet and Fire 7 Kids Edition tablet.

Both tablets replace the older versions of the Fire 7 and Kids Edition, pumping up the specs a little and offering even better value-for-money.

The new standard Fire 7 tablet and the Kids Edition tablet are now available for pre-order, with sales set to begin on June 6, so if you’re interested in the tablet for yourself, now is a great time to buy.

So how much does the all-new Amazon Fire 7 tablet cost? Well, it’s a measly $49.99. That’s a pretty impressive price for such a versatile tablet. For the Kids Edition, you will pay a little more at $99.99, but you also get a sturdy case, a two-year warranty, and extra content for kids with a free year of FreeTime Unlimited.

Amazon Fire 7 Tablet specs and features

amazon fire 7 tablet 2019Amazon

The Fire 7 tablet has a 7-inch screen with a resolution of 1,024 x 600 pixels. Although it’s not a Full HD resolution, it looks good enough on the small 7-inch screen, and for the $49.99 price, it’s hard to beat.

Of course, it’s what’s under the hood that’s most important. The all-new Fire 7 tablet offers a faster quad-core 1.3GHz processor, along with 16GB of internal storage, which isn’t bad for the price. If you want, you can upgrade the device to 32GB of storage to hold more movies, games, books, and apps.

Perhaps the best thing about the all-new Fire 7 tablet is the fact that it comes with Alexa, so you can use your voice to control your smart home, play music, and more. It’s also available in four nice colors: black, plum, sage, and twilight blue.

Buy the all-new Amazon Fire 7 tablet on Amazon, $49.99

Amazon Fire 7 Kids Edition Tablet specs and features

amazon_fire_7_kids_editionAmazon

The Fire 7 Kids Edition has all the same specs as the standard Fire 7 tablet, but in a kid-friendly design and with tweaked software. The tablet comes with one year of Amazon FreeTime Unlimited, which includes more than 20,000 books, audiobooks, games, videos, and more for kids.

The thick, rubbery case offers good grip for little hands, a sturdy kickstand, and good drop protection, as kids can be a bit rough with their gadgets. Amazon also offers a two-year worry-free warranty for the Kids Edition, so if the kids break it, Amazon will replace it.

You can preorder both versions of the 2019 Fire 7 tablet on Amazon and they’ll ship on June 6.

Buy the all-new Amazon Fire 7 Kids Edition tablet on Amazon, $99.99

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via Business Insider http://bit.ly/2EtG3g7 via business phone number

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